Viewing Top 10 Reasons to Buy Local

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#10 Ensure Portland stands out from the crowd

Top 10 Reasons to Buy Local  

In an increasingly homogenized world, communities that preserve their one-of-a-kind businesses and distinctive character are more likely to attract entrepreneurs and new investment. Portlanders place a high value on individuality and consider our homegrown enterprises a source of pride. They are also an attraction to visitors.

#9 Preserve entrepreneurship

Top 10 Reasons to Buy Local  

Entrepreneurship fuels America’s economic innovation and prosperity, and serves as a key means for families to move out of low-wage jobs and into the middle class. Plus, the success of locally owned, independent businesses provides real-life inspiration to our young people, proving that they can stay in Maine and prosper on their own terms.

#8 Benefit from local owners’ expertise

Top 10 Reasons to Buy Local  

Local business owners and employees often possess a level of expertise and a passion for the products they sell that is unmatched by employees and managers of national chains. They also tend to have a greater interest in getting to know their customers—who are, after all, also their neighbors. Simply put, local owners and employees take a special pride in their trade.

#7 Have more choices

Top 10 Reasons to Buy Local  

A marketplace of thousands of small businesses helps to ensure more innovation and competition, and lower prices over the long term. Independent businesses, choosing products based on what their local customers need and desire, not a national sales plan, guarantees a more diverse range of product and service choices.

#6 Conserve your tax dollars

Top 10 Reasons to Buy Local  

  1. Small neighborhood and downtown businesses require less public infrastructure and make more efficient use of city services compared to sprawling big-box stores and shopping centers, which are far more costly in terms of road work and police services, according to studies. 4

4 Randall Gross, Development Economics, “Understanding the Fiscal Impacts of Land Use in Ohio,” August 2004; Tischler & Associates, “Fiscal Impact Analysis of Residential and Nonresidential Land Use Prototypes,” July 2002.

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Thank you sustaining members!

Aikido of Maine   /   Andrew and Debra Tenenbaum   /   BENCHMARK Residential & Investment Real Estate   /   Brianna Courneya   /   Bull Feeney's   /   Casco Bay EyeCare   /   Casco Bay Frames & Gallery   /   Coffee By Design   /   CornerStone Building & Restoration   /   Danielle Marks   /   David Munster’s TV   /   Fish & Bone   /   Goodwill Industries of Northern New England   /   Green Clean Maine   /   In’finiti Fermentation & Distillation   /   Joan Leitzer   /   Joe Gervais   /   John McVeigh   /   Kristen Smith   /   Marsh Agency   /   Mitch and Peg Cyr   /   Nine Stones   /   Nomads   /   Peter Metsch   /   Planet Dog Foundation   /   Port Property Management   /   Portland’s Downtown District   /   Sebago Brewing Company   /   Stacy Mitchell   /   The Great Lost Bear   /   The SunriseGuide   /   TruChoice FCU   /   Tsunami Tattoo   /   Vervacious   /   Videoport   /   XPress Copy